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start work Video stream from pi to faster pc

master
Lennart Heimbs 2 years ago
parent
commit
559fe7f09d
3 changed files with 125 additions and 0 deletions
  1. 45
    0
      camera/video_client_pi.py
  2. 46
    0
      camera/video_client_pi_cv2.py
  3. 34
    0
      camera/video_server.py

+ 45
- 0
camera/video_client_pi.py View File

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import io
import socket
import struct
import time
import picamera

# Connect a client socket to my_server:8000 (change my_server to the
# hostname of your server)
client_socket = socket.socket()
client_socket.connect(('my_server', 8000))

# Make a file-like object out of the connection
connection = client_socket.makefile('wb')
try:
with picamera.PiCamera() as camera:
camera.resolution = (640, 480)
# Start a preview and let the camera warm up for 2 seconds
camera.start_preview()
time.sleep(2)

# Note the start time and construct a stream to hold image data
# temporarily (we could write it directly to connection but in this
# case we want to find out the size of each capture first to keep
# our protocol simple)
start = time.time()
stream = io.BytesIO()
for foo in camera.capture_continuous(stream, 'jpeg'):
# Write the length of the capture to the stream and flush to
# ensure it actually gets sent
connection.write(struct.pack('<L', stream.tell()))
connection.flush()
# Rewind the stream and send the image data over the wire
stream.seek(0)
connection.write(stream.read())
# If we've been capturing for more than 30 seconds, quit
if time.time() - start > 30:
break
# Reset the stream for the next capture
stream.seek(0)
stream.truncate()
# Write a length of zero to the stream to signal we're done
connection.write(struct.pack('<L', 0))
finally:
connection.close()
client_socket.close()

+ 46
- 0
camera/video_client_pi_cv2.py View File

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import io
import socket
import struct
import time
import cv2

# Connect a client socket to my_server:8000 (change my_server to the
# hostname of your server)
client_socket = socket.socket()
client_socket.connect(('my_server', 8000))

# Make a file-like object out of the connection
connection = client_socket.makefile('wb')
try:
cap = cv2.
with picamera.PiCamera() as camera:
camera.resolution = (640, 480)
# Start a preview and let the camera warm up for 2 seconds
camera.start_preview()
time.sleep(2)

# Note the start time and construct a stream to hold image data
# temporarily (we could write it directly to connection but in this
# case we want to find out the size of each capture first to keep
# our protocol simple)
start = time.time()
stream = io.BytesIO()
for foo in camera.capture_continuous(stream, 'jpeg'):
# Write the length of the capture to the stream and flush to
# ensure it actually gets sent
connection.write(struct.pack('<L', stream.tell()))
connection.flush()
# Rewind the stream and send the image data over the wire
stream.seek(0)
connection.write(stream.read())
# If we've been capturing for more than 30 seconds, quit
if time.time() - start > 30:
break
# Reset the stream for the next capture
stream.seek(0)
stream.truncate()
# Write a length of zero to the stream to signal we're done
connection.write(struct.pack('<L', 0))
finally:
connection.close()
client_socket.close()

+ 34
- 0
camera/video_server.py View File

@@ -0,0 +1,34 @@
import io
import socket
import struct
from PIL import Image

# Start a socket listening for connections on 0.0.0.0:8000 (0.0.0.0 means
# all interfaces)
server_socket = socket.socket()
server_socket.bind(('0.0.0.0', 8000))
server_socket.listen(0)

# Accept a single connection and make a file-like object out of it
connection = server_socket.accept()[0].makefile('rb')
try:
while True:
# Read the length of the image as a 32-bit unsigned int. If the
# length is zero, quit the loop
image_len = struct.unpack('<L', connection.read(struct.calcsize('<L')))[0]
if not image_len:
break
# Construct a stream to hold the image data and read the image
# data from the connection
image_stream = io.BytesIO()
image_stream.write(connection.read(image_len))
# Rewind the stream, open it as an image with PIL and do some
# processing on it
image_stream.seek(0)
image = Image.open(image_stream)
print('Image is %dx%d' % image.size)
image.verify()
print('Image is verified')
finally:
connection.close()
server_socket.close()

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